PBS Kids Presents Dr. Seuss Marathon

PBS kids

I have been a Dr. Seuss fan for as long as I can remember.  My love of Dr. Seuss started with the books my mom used to read to me as a child.  I’m always delighted when one of the books Paige picks of the shelf for me to read to her is The Cat in the Hat.  I mean, how could any child not love the clever rhymes, plot twists and rebellious heroes found in nearly ever Seuss book?   As my daughter has gotten older, we’ve slowly introduced television.  She is just now getting to the point where she actually watches a show.  That being said, I am really excited to see her reaction to the news below.  😆

To celebrate the 108th birthday of Dr. Seuss on March 2, 2012 (he died in 1991) PBS KIDS is having a two-hour marathon of  its popular new series The Cat in the Hat Knows A Lot About That! including two brand new episodes.   The TV series and online resources are designed to cultivate positive views about science and scientists among the next generation.  I loved this tip sheet found on the PBS website about how to bring out the scientist in your little one.

In addition to the marathon, kids and parents can enjoy clips of all four of the episodes for free online at PBSKids.org/video and also on the PBS Kids Video app for iPad, iPhone and iPod Touch. Here is the full press release detailing the celebration in full plus episode blurbs.

As an aside, this will be the first of many PBS specials I’ll be letting you know about because I’ve just started on as a PBS KIDS VIP, a group of parent bloggers who will be ambassadors to PBS through their blogs and other social media outlets. I’ve been invited to the PBS annual meeting where we will be talking about the PBS shows, apps and other special programs.  I can’t wait to share all the exciting information with you!  Also, MARCH 1st at 9pm EST, there is a twitter party with PBS Kids.  Be sure to follow @aMomKnowsBest & @PBSkids #CatintheHat to join in the fun!

GIVEAWAY:  A fun bag of Dr. Seuss/PBS Kids loot!  Leave a comment section below to win.

Below is the press release on the PBS kids marathon.

 

PBS KIDS CELEBRATES DR. SEUSS’ BIRTHDAY ON MARCH 2
WITH THE CAT IN THE HAT-A-THON MULTIMEDIA EVENT

Arlington, VA, February 2, 2012 – On March 2, PBS KIDS will celebrate the 108th birthday of Dr. Seuss on-air, online, and on mobile. PBS stations nationwide will feature THE CAT-IN-THE-HAT-A-THON, a two-hour marathon of THE CAT IN THE HAT KNOWS A LOT ABOUT THAT! (check local listings). Kids will also be able to engage with the Cat and friends through games and video content online and on mobile, and parents will be able to enjoy a new Birthday Party Builder Tool on the PBS KIDS Shop website.

“THE CAT IN THE HAT KNOWS A LOT ABOUT THAT! is designed to help young children learn core science skills to prepare them for success in school – while taking them on Seussian adventures that inspire their curiosity,” said Lesli Rotenberg, Senior Vice President, Children’s Media, PBS. “Families, schools and communities around the country pay tribute to Dr. Seuss at this time each year, and we join them in honoring his legacy with content that encourages kids to explore the world around them.”

THE CAT IN THE HAT-A-THON will feature two brand new episodes, “Seasons – Spring and Summer/Fall and Winter,” which takes the Cat, Nick and Sally on a journey through the four seasons, and “When I Grow Up/Doing It Differently,” in which Nick and Sally explore what it means to grow up and learn that trying a different approach can sometimes be the best way to solve a problem. The marathon will also include encore presentations of “Hooray for Hair/Ice Is Nice” and “Chasing Rainbows/Follow the Prints.”

The celebration will continue online and on mobile. Video clips from all four episodes featured in THE CAT IN THE HAT-A-THON will be available for free online at PBSKIDS.org/video and on the PBS KIDS Video App for iPad, iPhone and iPod touch. The PBS KIDS Shop will also launch a Birthday Party Builder Tool – a one-stop-shop for parents’ every party need – on March 1. From tableware and party banners to clothing and gifts, the Party Builder offers customized recommendations based on the number of guests and exclusive, personalized products. It’s a fun and easy way for parents to plan the perfect party featuring their kids’ favorite characters, including the Cat in the Hat.

THE CAT IN THE HAT KNOWS A LOT ABOUT THAT! has ranked among the top ten programs for children ages 2 to 5 since it premiered on PBS KIDS in September 2010.* The series is a key part of PBS KIDS’ commitment to helping kids build critical STEM – science, technology, engineering and math – skills through engaging content across platforms.

Images from these episodes are available on PBS PressRoom.

Following is a listing of the episodes airing during the March 2 CAT-IN-THE-HAT-A-THON (check local listings for air dates and times).

“Seasons – Spring and Summer/Fall and Winter” *NEW*

“Seasons – Spring and Summer” – For Show and Tell at school, Nick and Sally must bring something from their favorite season. But how can they choose which is their favorite? The Cat in the Hat takes them to the magical Garden of Seasons, where they can visit any season they like, any time they like! They meet three young animals and journey with them as they begin to grow up. Sally decides that she has two favorite seasons, and with the pictures taken from the Snaparama camera, she now has a scrapbook of pictures to show why!

“Seasons – Fall and Winter” – It’s Nick’s turn to choose a favorite season. Back to the Garden of Seasons to visit Fall and Winter! In Fall, they meet up with their friends from Spring and Summer to have a going away party for Candy the goose who’s about to fly south. In Winter, they have a great time playing with Sam the hare while all his other friends hibernate. Nick can’t decide on just one season, so he makes a picture of all the fun they had in both seasons!

“When I Grow Up/Doing Things Differently” *NEW*

“When I Grow Up” – Sally and Nick are trying to guess what they’ll be when they grow up when the Cat drops in for a visit. Cat is sure Nick and Sally will never guess what his friend Puggle will be when she grows up. When they see her, they start guessing right away! A frog? A duck? No, a beaver! They discover that, while Puggle may have some similarities to other creatures, she will grow up to be a duck billed platypus.

“Doing It Differently” – Nick and Sally can’t seem to find Harvey the guinea pig. They find the Cat in the Hat instead! Cat suggests that Sally and Nick might find Harvey by meeting three friends who always do things differently – like a bird that runs instead of flies, or a cat that swims, or a fish that walks on the mud! Nick and Sally are sure to find Harvey now – by doing it differently!

“Hooray for Hair/Ice Is Nice”

“Hooray for Hair” – Sally and Nick are getting their hair cut today; maybe they should try new hairstyles! A trip to meet three of Cat’s friends (and some styling help from the Wig-o-lator) will help them decide! Should they have Yak hair? No, too hot! How about hair like a fur seal? Not quite, too short. A porcupine? No way! How will they ever get a hug from their moms with hair that spiky? They decide that the hair they have is what’s perfect for them!

“Ice Is Nice” – Nick and Sally want some nice cold lemonade, but there are no more ice cubes in Sally’s fridge! A trip to Freeze-your-knees Snowland will fix that! They meet Cat’s friend Polly the polar bear who introduces Sally and Nick to all the different kinds of ice that make up her home. After trying many types of ice, they find the kind that will be perfect for their lemonade!

“Chasing Rainbows/Follow the Prints”

“Chasing Rainbows” – The kids are painting a picture of a rainbow but can’t remember all the colors to use. Luckily for them, Cat takes them to Color-ga-lore to meet King Kaleidoscope, an expert on rainbows! A musical number teaches them the proper color order, and a silly spray of water leads them to discover how to make their very own rainbow!

“Follow the Prints” – Nick and Sally are enjoying a backyard picnic when they discover their last strawberry has gone missing! Who could have taken it? Cat’s friend Cluey Looey can help them! They are off to Muddyfeet Waterhole where they learn about how the differently shaped feet, paws, or hooves of various animals make differently shaped footprints. Back home, they follow the prints and discover their strawberry was taken by a squirrel! Luckily, the Cat has some more!

About THE CAT IN THE HAT KNOWS A LOT ABOUT THAT!

THE CAT IN THE HAT KNOWS A LOT ABOUT THAT! was created in response to recent findings that children graduating from kindergarten are less prepared to learn about science than about other subjects. The series supports young children’s science learning by introducing scientific inquiry skills, teaching core science concepts and vocabulary, and preparing preschoolers for kindergarten and first grade science curriculum — all in whimsical style.

A team of science and early childhood experts developed the curriculum for the first season’s 40 episodes, each of which begins with a question posed by Sally or Nick. Although the Cat knows a lot of things, his insatiable curiosity to learn more about the world leads to adventures with Sally and Nick in his one-of-a-kind Thinga-ma-jigger, a marvelously Seuss-ian contraption that sprouts wings, pontoons, booster rockets, skis, and just about anything else needed to find the answer. The inquisitive gang travels to the bottom of the sea to observe giant sea worms, zips to the rain forest to visit animals living in Kapok trees, and shrinks to bee-size to visit a hive and learn how honey is made. Guided by the Cat, the kids figure things out by observing, collecting and managing clues, making connections, constructing and evaluating theories, and having discussions – all in a preschool-appropriate manner. Produced by Portfolio Entertainment Inc. and Collingwood O’Hare Productions, in association with Dr. Seuss Enterprises, Random House Children’s Entertainment, Treehouse, and PBS KIDS, THE CAT IN THE HAT KNOWS A LOT ABOUT THAT! is based on Random House’s best selling Beginner Book collection, “The Cat in the Hat’s Learning Library.”

Good Reads!

Reading is one of my great life passions.   It is a thrill to become totally immersed in a good book.  As a member of two monthly book clubs, I enjoy most things I read, but each year come away with only a few books that I can say I truly loved.  Below are the six I read in 2011 that I could not put down, and a couple that I’ve picked up in 2012 that are already on my favorite books list.

Cutting For Stone by Abraham Verghese; Marion and Shiva Stone are twin brothers born of a secret union between a beautiful Indian nun and a brash British surgeon. Orphaned by their mother’s death and their father’s disappearance, bound together by a preternatural connection and a shared fascination with medicine, the twins come of age as Ethiopia hovers on the brink of revolution.  Moving from Addis Ababa to New York City and back again, Cutting for Stone is an unforgettable story of love and betrayal, medicine and ordinary miracles–and two brothers whose fates are forever intertwined.

 

 The Forgotten Garden  by Kate Morton; A tiny girl is abandoned on a ship headed for Australia in 1913. She arrives completely alone with nothing but a small suitcase containing a few clothes and a single book—a beautiful volume of fairy tales. She is taken in by the dockmaster and his wife and raised as their own. On her twenty-first birthday, they tell her the truth, and with her sense of self shattered and very little to go on, “Nell” sets out to trace her real identity. Her quest leads her to Blackhurst Manor on the Cornish coast and the secrets of the doomed Mountrachet family. But it is not until her granddaughter, Cassandra, takes up the search after Nell’s death that all the pieces of the puzzle are assembled.

Sarah’s Key by Tatiana de Rosnay; Paris, July 1942: Sarah, a ten-year-old girl, is taken with her parents by the French police as they go door to door arresting Jewish families in the middle of the night. Desperate to protect her younger brother, Sarah locks him in a bedroom cupboard—their secret hiding place—and promises to come back for him as soon as they are released.

 

 

Room by Emma Donoghue; To five-year-old-Jack, Room is the world. It’s where he was born, it’s where he and his Ma eat and sleep and play and learn. At night, his Ma shuts him safely in the wardrobe, where he is meant to be asleep when Old Nick visits. Room is home to Jack, but to Ma it’s the prison where she has been held for seven years. Through her fierce love for her son, she has created a life for him in this eleven-by-eleven-foot space. But with Jack’s curiosity building alongside her own desperation, she knows that Room cannot contain either much longer.

 

 Little Bee by Chris Cleave;  This novel explains the intertwined fates of a 16-year-old Nigerian orphan (who calls herself Little Bee) and a well-off British couple–journalists trying to repair their strained marriage with a free holiday–who should have stayed behind their resort’s walls. What happens on a Nigerian beach brings her into their world and forever alters the course of their lives.

 

 

Unbroken by Laura Hillenbrand; The story is that of Louie Zamperini – a track and field star of the 1930’s, who participated in the Berlin olympics, was part of the US air force in WWII, was shot down over the ocean, was adrift in the Pacific for over a month, was held as a POW by the Japanese forces and finally made it back to his life and has had the courage to live it to its fullest.

 

 

Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet by Jamie Ford; Great to read after the above book, Unbroken, because it gives an entirely different perspective during the same time period in history. Chronicling the relationship between two 12 yr. olds, a Chinese boy, and Japanese girl in San Francisco in the early 1940’s. It provides a brief glimpse into what each culture had to face as American Immigrants in a bitter-sweet tale.

 

 

Mountains Beyond Mountains: The Quest of Dr. Paul Farmer, The Man Who Would Cure The World  by Tracy Kidder; Compelling and inspiring, Paul Farmer sets out on his mission to cure infectious diseases, and to bring the lifesaving tools of modern medicine to those who need them most. From Harvard to Haiti, Peru, Cuba, and Russia, Farmer changes minds and practices through his dedication to the philosophy that “the only real nation is humanity.” At the heart of this book is the example of a life based on hope and on an understanding of the truth of the Haitian proverb “Beyond mountains there are mountains”–as you solve one problem, another problem presents itself, and so you go on and try to solve that one too.

 

I cannot wait to delve into the next books that are lining up for 2012, and anticipate finding new favorites among them.  The Tiger’s Wife, The Paris Wife, and Freedom are a few on my list. What is on your list? Please share your recent favorites.  Did you find any that you loved?

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My 5 Favorite Activities I Do with My Kids!

With the hectic schedules most of us lead, it’s nice to find some quality time with the kids for at least a few minutes a day.  You can be around your kids all day, but sometimes that day can fly by without doing anything meaningful with them.  Research has shown that spending quality time helps in the maturation and social-emotional development of children.  It helps them feel bonded with and attached to the family as an important member with something to contribute.  Quality time builds a child’s self-esteem and confidence in things they do.  Here are my five favorite things I do with my kids to spend quality time with them:

1. Night Talks

Snuggling with the kids at night and finding out about their day for about 10-15  minutes can be a meaningful and very much a learning experience for parents.  I’ve had the most open and honest talks with my kids during this time.  I learn so much about who they are.  I try and do it about twice a week!  The kids love “snuggle time!”

 

2. Reading with the Kids

Many parents do this already!  You should read to your kids, or with your kids, every night.  This is a nice meaningful time with kids, and it is also an important time for them in their education.  It’s a nice bonding time as well.

 

3. Playing with the Kids

It’s important to play with your kids!  As young kids, they need the modeling of how to play, how to be creative/imaginative, and how to interact appropriately in play.  Kids also love it when you get silly and just “be a kid” with them once in a while too!  Have fun with it!  It will bring you closer to your kids!

 

4. Going to Shows with Kids

I love going to shows with my kids.  It’s nice for them to learn to sit and watch a live show and to enjoy it.  We usually talk about it beforehand so they know what is going to happen, and even what kind of music might be sung.  We’ve been to quite a few together, and they ALWAYS love this quality time with us!  Sometimes we go on Mother-Daughter dates to shows.  Go Diego Go Live was probably one of the best we’ve been to!  And yes, dates with the kids is important, especially when you have more than one child.  It gives one kid at a time their “special time” with mom or dad!

 

5. Dinnertime Roundtable

While growing up, this is the quality time I remember having with my family.  Whether at a restaurant or at home, sitting at the table together for meals creates a nice setting for talking and finding out what everyone is thinking and doing.  It’s so easy these days to want to just take your meal to the computer or TV, but you’re missing out on some quality talk and share time with your family if you do that.

 

Overall, it is just important to be engaged with your kids, listen to them fully (making eye contact), and make them feel important.  You can’t have quality time ALL the time, but you can make a point to try to make time for it throughout the week.  An hour here, and an hour there!  The kids will appreciate it, learn from it, and feel more bonded to you and confident as individuals.  It will also be meaningful for you and help you keep good memories with your kids to treasure.

* How do you make time in your busy schedule for quality time with the kids?

Kristin Wheeler

My 5 Favorite Websites for Kids

Being a former teacher of 4th-8th graders, and having technology as an area of focus in my teaching, I always search to find good educational sites for my kids to utilize for their “computer time.”  I look for how easy the site is to navigate, how interesting it is to my kids (and me), and what educational value it provides.  Here are a few sites that I found to have these qualities:

1.  Sesame Street (www.sesamestreet.org)

There are many cute games on this site that are fairly educational.  Both my kids around age 3 loved the sorting game with Zoe.  I was so amazed at their skills.  I had no idea they could even sort by color, size, or shape.  Both my kids also practiced their alphabet letters with Elmo.  They loved pushing a letter on the keyboard and hearing Elmo say it, and then they would watch to see what picture would come up that starts with that letter.  I would also choose a letter for them to find on the keyboard (added difficulty and skill).  There are some games on here “just for fun” too.  I would let them choose one to play with me, then I picked the rest.

2.  IXL (www.ixl.com)

This site is fabulous for grades Pre-K through 8th.  It focuses on math standards and has fun drills/games for kids to work on their math skills.  I love that you first click on the grade level you want, and then you can choose the topic.  It basically breaks the topics down into sections like a textbook, but with interactive ways to practice skills.  As a teacher, I think this is fabulous and would use it in the classroom if I were still teaching (now a stay-at-home mom).  Lastly, you can also click on the State you live in at the bottom of the page, and it will tell you how the site aligns with State math standards.  Very cool!  A+ for this site.

3.  Magic Keys – Children’s Storybooks Online (http://www.magickeys.com/books/index.html)

This site has storybooks for kids to read online from young readers to older readers.  The stories are cute and illustrated.  I especially like the stories with the volume icon on the side of them.  This shows that the story can be read to the kids.  It’s nice for beginning readers because they can follow along and read the words with the reader.  A good site to help improve reading skills, and keeping kids interested in reading (and actually learning about technology as well).

4.  PBS Kids (http://pbskids.org/)

Some of the games on this site are not as educational as others, but you can find some cute games for rhyming, spelling, math skills, and even science content-related games.  The Super Why games are fairly educational, and I really liked the measuring game under the Dinosaur Train games.  Another nice thing about this site, is that it states the learning goals/curriculum areas of study across the top of the screen as you click on each game.  Kids also like this site because they can connect with familiar characters that they see on TV.

5.  Sheppard Software (http://www.sheppardsoftware.com/web_games.htm)

I found this site while searching for a good website for my daughter to practice her States.  It has games for State recognition, State placement, States and Capitals, etc.  This site is good for 1st grade on up!  Adults can even revisit their knowledge of the States if they need some brushing up on their facts.  The site is very basic (not too many bells and whistles), but it’s easy to use and highly educational.  I’m sure we will be using it for years to come!

Obviously, I love the fact there is technology available as a tool for kids to use in their learning, but I also feel that it needs to be used appropriately.  “Computer time” should be limited for kids (just like TV time), and it is most effective when kids are supervised by an adult.  Parents can help kids use the sites correctly, monitor how well kids navigate through the sites, and even use the experience to aid in additional learning for their kids.  “Computer time” can be used as a nice bonding time with kids, and as the kids become more familiar with their favorite parent-approved sites, some freedom can be given as kids use programs like skill drills to reinforce learning.  Have fun!  Use technology as a tool for learning, not a babysitter!

*  What are your favorite sites for kids?

Kristin Wheeler

This Year’s 5 Best Book Club Books

I am in two different book clubs, so I try to finish two books a month.  Some months are harder to keep up with than others, but I try my best.  When a book really sucks me in, I can finish it quickly.  Here are the five books that I found to be interesting, easy, and fast reads (mainly because I loved them and found them highly entertaining).

Book #1:  The Hunger Games by, Suzanne Collins

This book was great!  It was fast moving, and easy to read.  I liked the futuristic setting and developing romance between characters.  If you are queasy reading about violence, then this book may not be for you.  It’s not gory, but there is violence.  I have also read the other two books in this series (Catching Fire and Mockingjay).  I loved them all!  These books are in the young adult section, but adults seem to love them too (like the Twilight or Harry Potter series).

Book #2:  Shanghai Girls by, Lisa See


This book was really good.  The characters were very complex.  I loved reading about the Asian culture and what was going on in Shanghai.  It shows the relationship between two sisters, their escape to America, and their life after making it to California with their “paper husbands.”  It was very educational, entertaining, and emotional.  I heard Lisa See’s book, Snow Flower and the Secret Fan is also wonderful.  It’s on my “to read” list.

Book #3:  The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Society by, Mary Ann Shaffer and Annie Barrows


This book also was very educational as well as entertaining.  It takes place in the Guernsey Islands during the war when the Nazi’s where invading.  The character interaction is interesting, and the idea that the book club they spontaneously created “saved” them was fantastic.  There was so much to the story line, and after just a few chapters I couldn’t put it down.

Book #4:  Loving Frank by, Nancy Horan


This book based on the life of architect Frank Lloyd Wright was highly fascinating.  Again, it is historical in nature.  It’s a love story, and follows his relationship with mate (Mamah Borthwick Cheney) through many trials and tribulations.  The end is quite shocking (historically accurate), so don’t make the mistake of Googling the real story before you finish the book if you don’t already know it.  I made that mistake and wish I hadn’t.  I got too wrapped up in the story I wanted to know everything about the characters, but I wish I had not read that part before I finished the book.

Book #5:  Bitter is the New Black:  Confessions of a Condescending, Egomaniacal, Self-Centered Smartass, Or, Why You Should Never Carry A Prada Bag to the Unemployment Office by, Jen Lancaster

This book is completely different than the others I liked.  It is really light and comedic.  I was laughing the entire time, and I could relate to many of the situations the author, Jen Lancaster, went through.  It is a quick and fun read.  She has many other books out as well that are on my list.  I think the reality TV book looks good (My Fair Lazy).  It’s one I think I will be able to relate to, as I am a reality TV show junkie.

 

* What are your favorite books?  I am also working on my 5 favorite books of all time (which is very difficult to do, as I love so many!).

Kristin Wheeler

Reading: Good for Your Social Life and Good for Your Kids

Before having children I was an avid reader – and why not? I had lots of unstructured time with which to do what I pleased. When I was single in NYC, there were long subway rides, lazy Sunday mornings in bed, and quiet moments after dinner to while away in the pursuit of a good read. One marriage and four kids later, those days are a distant memory. In fact, we gave up our Sunday New York Times subscription last year because the guilt of not reading it outweighed the sadness of cancelling it. The stacks of New Yorkers around the house, most of which I merely scan, or worse, restack, are enough of a reminder of the time “we used to have” for reading.

I haven’t completely given up on staying abreast of current events, though. In place of the NYT we now subscribe to The Week magazine. This terrific compendium of newsworthy events from around the globe has become a family favorite. It arrives weekly with the most perfectly digestible amounts of information and opinion. Since we made this switch, the most wonderful thing has happened – our kids read it. They also read The New Yorker. It must have something to do with the magazine’s prominent placement in the main loo, but never mind that, they read it and discuss it with us, and that is grand.In fact, when it arrives we all scramble to see who can get a hold of it first. I must say, it’s a hoot to hear my 10 year old recount a strange fact he read that day in an adult conversational style at dinner – a vast improvement over the usual scatological drivel the group can stoop to.

The sad truth is, that when I finally get the four kids to bed, I’m often so zonked, that reading acts like a soporific and puts me right to sleep.  I was becoming increasingly frustrated, not to mention nervous, about the growing tower of books leaning over my head as I slept, many of them with bookmarks in just the first few chapters. I needed a push, and lo and behold, along came the answer: Book Club. This has been a reading lifesaver. Were it not for the incentive that the next meeting date provides, I might never finish a book! There’s something about knowing that if you don’t finish, then you really shouldn’t go to Book Club where you’ll eventually hear the ending of the book discussed. By not attending you would avoid that, but you would also miss out on the company of friends, good wine and yummy food. That’s just unacceptable in my book (ha!). I look so forward to my time with my friends, that to miss any is unthinkable. So, I try to read the book no matter what it takes. Sometimes I sit in the hostess’ driveway until I do. I’ve also seen fellow Book Club pals reading in a wingback in the corner while the social portion is underway, or one time at a school meeting beforehand. Many of us treat it like a requirement for participation (it’s not), and as a result of our determination, we are rewarded by lively discussions and great camaraderie.

Recently, one of my pals from our ‘Reading Between the Wines’ Book Club informed us of a study that was conducted by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development which states, “a mother’s reading skill is the greatest determinant of her children’s future academic success, outweighing other factors, such as neighborhood and family income.” http://www.nichd.nih.gov/news/releases/102510-reading-family-income.cfm

My eldest

Well, that right there is motivation enough for me! If I can revel in friendship and accomplishment while also improving my child’s chances of scholastic success, then I am more than happy – I’m successful. Maureen wrote here at AMKB about pursuing passion, as did Carla. In my life now, my marriage, my kids, and my friends are my passions, and books are hot on their heels. Through a few adjustments to what I read and how I read, I have been able to keep up with current events and great novels, while deepening my friendships and benefiting my children. A win-win I’d say.

My Chinese fortune cookie the other night said, “The world is a beautiful book for those who read it.”  Yes, so true.

I’d love to hear your stories of book clubs and about any great books you’ve read.

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